9 Key Benefits of Writing a Short eBook

Publishing a high-quality book of any kind is a great thing to do. It showcases your expertise so you can attract people to your list and find new clients. Somehow, putting something in writing – and doing it well – instantly conveys the message that you are knowledgeable, capable and confident in yourself and your topic. If you believe writing a book has to be a time-consuming and slow process, I am here to show you that there is another way, and it’s called an eBook (Kindle, Nook, Kobo or iBook).

Read More Post a comment (0)

What type of book do you want to write?

October 23, 2015 |  by  |  7-Day eBook, Seed Signature & Star, Self-publishing  |  Share

Choosing the type of book you want to write may not be a decision you are aware that you need to make, but it is. There are many different types of non-fiction business book that you could write; I have identified around seven but I’m sure there are more. However, I believe that for practical purposes, there are three main types and I call them Seed, Signature and Star.

Read More Post a comment (0)

Why publishing a book requires partnership

As a self-publisher, you may think that partnership is going to be the one element you will miss by producing your own book. But that is not the case. The opportunities for partnership are still there.

Read More Post a comment (0)

Survive the publication process

Many self-publishing authors worry about being able to survive the publication process. And that isn't surprising because it is a demanding time: finding an editor, knowing how much to pay them, understanding what they do, knowing how to handle having your book edited, knowing what to do to get the book formatted or designed and so it goes on.

Read More Post a comment (0)

Surviving the book production process

The book production process is definitely a challenging part of getting your book published. There are four distinct phases to the publication process: conceptualizing and planning, writing and revising, production, and marketing. In my view, as a business owner there is a fifth process, too, and that is monetizing – the process of turning your book into a money-making product or one that significantly develops and grows your business in some way. Today, though, I’m going to focus on the book production process because it is a place that many self-publishing authors get stuck, especially if they want to get their book published in print.

Read More Post a comment (0)

5 Secrets of Successful Authors

There are probably more than 5 secrets of successful authors, but these five secrets are critical and if you do everything listed here you will publish with far greater success. There are exceptions to every rule, but there are also patterns that recur. When it comes to success in publishing, there are always stories of authors being rejected time and again who go on to be multi-million bestsellers. J K Rowling and Agatha Christie are two names that spring to mind. Publishing isn’t always logical; there are often surprise successes – and failures. That’s what makes it exciting.

Read More Post a comment (0)

Get your first draft finished

Do you need to get your first draft finished? If you are struggling to maintain your momentum and get your words on the page you are probably feeling frustrated and stuck.

Read More Post a comment (0)

The Publishing Process – Editing

The publishing process can be confusing and difficult to navigate. When I first started working in publishing, it took me a while for me to totally understand the process, so I sympathise with you if you are coming to it for the first time. The truth is that the publishing process is not set in stone. There are variations to it depending on the format you are using to publish your book: Kindle, (or another electronic format), print (self-publishing), PDF and the traditional method used by professional publishing houses (although this has also changed substantially since the advent of desktop publishing). When I started out in publishing, there were no computers. We did everything on paper. No wonder it took so long to publish a book! The text of the book was produced twice, once as galley proofs (long sheets of typeset pages with no page breaks) and page proofs. In between galleys and page proofs was the design process called paste-up, and yes, the typeset galley text was literally pasted onto printed page templates using a sticky spray glue that allowed pieces of paper to be put in place then moved again if necessary. We went through gallons of that glue! Life got simpler when everything became electronic, although the editors who didn't like computers would probably disagree with me. The arrival of so-called desktop publishing sped up the process by months as the edited manuscript could be pasted (not with glue!) directly from Word to QuarkXpress (the publishing standard software) that the book designer had already set up. The editor could then tweak the page proofs so the text fitted correctly on each page and add editorial and proof-reading changes directly. This meant that the editor and designer were now doing the work that the typesetters and printers used to do. However,...

Read More Post a comment (0)