Would publishing in Kindle be a compromise?

July 21, 2016 |  by  |  Kindle, Print, Writing a book  |  Share

Do you dream about writing a book? Do you fantasize about that moment when you hold your book in your hands and see your finished book? Would publishing in Kindle be a compromise?

If you think it is, you’re not alone. Most solopreneurs and aspiring authors visualise that moment in their mind’s eye and for them, publishing in Kindle would be big compromise. No shiny book, no ‘thing’ to show off to family and friends, just a listing on Amazon’s Kindle Store.

It might feel a bit disappointing… a bit of a compromise.

I get it. I spent 15 years of my life as an editor in non-fiction book publishing. I remember how excited I was when the book I’d been working on for the past nine months (sometimes more) was in my hands – and when everyone in the office was holding it, flicking through it and talking about it. It was always a rewarding and magical moment. It was a lot of what made the job so great.

If you feel that only publishing in Kindle would be a compromise for you, I want to tell you that I understand. I understand that urge to have a physical book in your hands and to be able to share it with your friends, family, clients as well as others in your circle.

But there is a price to pay for a printed book, especially if you have your own business. And that price comes in the form of time, money and impact.

You see, a printed book is a fantastic thing, but it takes a lot longer to produce than a Kindle book. To produce a printed book you need to write at least 30,000 words (and preferably 40-50,000 words) if it is going to fill enough pages to make a decent-sized book. (That’s unless you fill it with illustrations or diagrams, of course!)

On the other hand, a Kindle book can be almost any length because it’s electronic. It can be anything from 8000-20,000 words so there’s a lot of flexibility. It could even be shorter. So if you want to write a focused, short book it’s the ideal format.

If you compare the different amount of time it will take to write a 10,000 word Kindle book and a 30,000 word book for print, you’ll instantly understand the opportunity offered by Kindle.

The Kindle example

Let’s say you decided to write a 10,000 word book that you publish in Kindle format. It would probably take you 10-12 hours to write it (so your book could be written in two weeks). You could probably write 1000 words a day easily (based on the theory that it would probably only take you about an hour to produce 1000 words). After that, it would probably take about two to three weeks to get your book revised and edited ready for publication. In total, around
6-8 weeks.

The print example

Alternatively, let’s say you decide to write a relatively short physical book of 30,000 words. It’ll probably take you around 40 hours to write it. If you wrote for an hour a day, it would take you about 40 days to write – so at least six weeks. And then there are all the revisions and edits to do (30,000 words will take a while)…and then there is the page layouts. You can easily add several more weeks for the book’s production. If you’re lucky, your book will probably take about three months from the point where you start writing. No wonder people hesitate when I talk to them about writing a book!

Is publishing in Kindle a compromise?

When compared with a printed book, publishing in Kindle is faster an easier.

If you’re a busy coach, trainer, speaker, therapist or any other kind of solopreneur, Kindle offers you a huge bonus because it means you can get your book written and published much faster. That means your book is out there working for you months ahead of when a physical book is ready.

Even better, I’d hazard a guess that once you’ve produced one short Kindle book, you’d be able to produce another and another – and each time you’d get faster and more efficient at doing it. That will give you even more impact in your field and in your market.

If you stick with print, you might manage two or – if you’re a complete workaholic, have an expert team and a pot of cash behind you – maybe three books a year. With Kindle, you could write a new book every month (if you really wanted to) but you could probably publish five or six with relative ease, especially once you’ve found a cover designer and editor to help you.

If you want to be an author but think the path to publication is going to be long, slow and expensive, think again. Kindle is a game-changer. You could become a prolific author, provide many ways to reach out to your ideal clients and help masses of people with a Kindle book in just a few weeks.

I think it’s a win-win – and far more rewarding than that single moment (after months of work) when you hold your printed book in your hand. It’s great, but is it worth it? When you think about it, would publishing in Kindle be such a compromise?


Get my free eBook and discover how a Kindle book can get you published, get you out there and turn you into a published author quickly and easily. I’ll share the reason why – as a seasoned and experienced publisher and business owner – I love Kindle! I’ll even help you plan your book and get your first 1000 words written. Get the eBook today!

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Deborah Taylor

Hello, I’m Deborah Taylor, the founder of Book-Launch Your Business. Thank you for taking the time to read my blog post. I hope you found it helpful. If you want to write a book, please contact me to find out how I can help you publish a book that is right for you and your business.


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